Being Proud of Filipino Creativity

January 29, 2006

I found one link in our company intranet blog posted by Dwayne, our Creative Director about the Filipino ingenuity. It is a very heartwarming story that I never hesitated to post my comments about it.

While Filipino contribution to the world hasn’t been prominent (talk about Wright brothers and Isaac Merritt Singer from America, Austrian Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Russia’s Vladimir Kosma Zworykin and Ivan Pavlov, Britain’s Britain’s Richard Trevithick, Italian pizza or India’s curry, Swiss cheese and French wine) Filipino workforce is more widely-known for dedication to job, creativity and appreciation for work.

Photo shows a weaving shop filled with busy Pinoy workers weaving some creative products, most of which will find their way to the glitzy boutiques of Parish, London and Tokyo. It’s true that many Filipino ideas have been sold to and patented foreign companies for mass use. This is mainly attributed to the failure of the government to support such product which could have benefited the Filipino people by generating jobs, boosting investor confidence and retaining the honor to the name of the inventor rather than the wealthy conglomerate.

And even if the government is often at the receiving end of endless blaming, many of its agencies work hard despite the usual problems such as logistics and camaraderie among its people. One of which is CITEM which serves as facilitator among manufacturers and buyers. The result has once again proven that Filipinos don’t need expensive machineries to come up with quality design. Especially in the furniture world, the work of hand has dominated the ones that are built by machines; a clear indication that nothing beats the old hand.

In a country more known for its domestic helpers and chaotic South than skilled laborers and serene beaches, this news is definitely a shot in the arm, an inspiration that shows little-known hardworkers share the dream of a prosperous nation, and not just the overseas Filipino workers.

PHOTO CREDITS: William Gordon. Originally published at core77.com.

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